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Posts Tagged ‘Battle’

The Battle of Bay Trail-D: GIGABYTE J1900N-D3V and ASUS J1900I-C Reviewed

October 19th, 2014 No comments

All the recent talk of Haswell-E and high-end refreshes has obscured the more casual computing market. The Bay Trail platform uses Intel’s Atom based Silvermont cores and competes directly against AMD’s Kabini for integrated computing, digital signage and cheap computing models. Today we compare two mini-ITX Celeron J1900 based motherboards: the GIGABYTE J1900N-D3V at and the ASUS J1900I-C at , as well as the SoC itself.

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In-Win GT1 Case Review: Fighting an Uphill Battle

March 10th, 2013 No comments

If you've ever looked at a builder's guide for a desktop system on any major tech site (including this one), you've undoubtedly noticed that the first thing to get cut to make room in the budget is the enclosure. It's not hard to see why; as long as a case keeps things cool enough and runs quietly enough, for the most part it's doing its job. It's only when you look at the greater ecosystem of cases that the real sweet spot of the market (-9) becomes more apparent. What this means, though, is that the sub- market is very competitive, and when you start hovering between and , it's downright brutal.

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That competitive nature has forced manufacturers to get creative about fitting feature rich cases into lower price tags, and one of those cases is on hand today: the In-Win GT1. The GT1 features a hotswap bay, USB 3.0 connectivity, a semi-modular drive bay, and fan control, and comes in with an MSRP of . There's certainly potential for this case, but does it offer enough to beat the incumbent in this bracket, the cheaper Antec GX700?

In-Win GT1 Case Review: Fighting an Uphill Battle

March 8th, 2013 No comments

If you've ever looked at a builder's guide for a desktop system on any major tech site (including this one), you've undoubtedly noticed that the first thing to get cut to make room in the budget is the enclosure. It's not hard to see why; as long as a case keeps things cool enough and runs quietly enough, for the most part it's doing its job. It's only when you look at the greater ecosystem of cases that the real sweet spot of the market (-9) becomes more apparent. What this means, though, is that the sub- market is very competitive, and when you start hovering between and , it's downright brutal.

Small%20(3%20of%209) In Win GT1 Case Review: Fighting an Uphill Battle

That competitive nature has forced manufacturers to get creative about fitting feature rich cases into lower price tags, and one of those cases is on hand today: the In-Win GT1. The GT1 features a hotswap bay, USB 3.0 connectivity, a semi-modular drive bay, and fan control, and comes in with an MSRP of . There's certainly potential for this case, but does it offer enough to beat the incumbent in this bracket, the cheaper Antec GX700?

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Sony Xperia Z vs Samsung Galaxy S3 battle royale video

February 23rd, 2013 No comments

Blackberry Z10 vs Nokia Lumia 920 battle royale video

February 4th, 2013 No comments

Microsoft wins German patent battle against Motorola

September 23rd, 2012 No comments

SOFTWARE HOUSE Microsoft has won a German patent lawsuit against Motorola, after a judge ruled that Motorola infringes one of the Redmond firm’s patents.

The German court ruled that Motorola’s mobile devices infringe a Microsoft patent on methods for apps to handle different kinds of user input from onscreen keyboards, handwriting and voice recognition.

Microsoft’s feeling pretty chuffed, as this is its third court victory against Motorola.

In a statement to The Seattle Times, a Microsoft spokesperson said, “We’re pleased this decision builds on previous rulings in Germany that have already found Motorola is broadly infringing Microsoft’s intellectual property.

“We will continue to enforce injunctions against Motorola products in Germany and hope Motorola will join other Android device makers by taking a license to Microsoft’s patented inventions.”

It’s still unclear which Motorola products Microsoft will seek to ban in Germany.

Motorola also issued a statement, saying, “We are waiting for the written decision and are evaluating our options, including an appeal.”

Oddly enough, the same German court also ruled last week that Motorola infringes Apple’s patent for “over scroll bounce,” technology that lets users’ displays bounce back to the middle of a webpage when they’ve reached the bottom by swiping down on the touchscreen. µ

Motorola loses German patent battle against Apple

September 15th, 2012 No comments

A GERMAN COURT has ruled that Motorola infringed an Apple interface patent, which means that the firm might have to recall its Android phones and tablets.

In the case Apple claimed that Motorola infringed its German patent EP2126678. Apple’s patent involved the use of “over scroll bounce” technology that lets users bounce back to the middle of a webpage when they’ve reached the bottom by swiping down on the touchscreen.

According to Reuters, Apple’s legal victory doesn’t guarantee the final outcome of a ban on Motorola products. A German court spokesperson told the publication that Motorola still has the opportunity to appeal and Apple still needs to formally pay the 25mn euro bond before an injunction can go into effect.

The “over scroll bounce” patent ruling wasn’t the first time Apple brought Motorola to a German court this year. A German judge dismissed an Apple request to ban sales of the Motorola Xoom over design patent infringement last July.

Apple has been riding a wave of legal victories recently. The company claimed a US patent victory against Samsung last month.

A California jury handed the legal victory to Apple claiming Samsung used patented Iphone design features and technology in its smartphones. The same jury awarded Apple bn in damages.

2012 has been an eventful year for Motorola. Google bought the company’s mobile division for .5bn, and the buyout saw Google paying .5bn for Motorola patents alone.

Both Apple and Motorola were unavailable for comment at the time of publication. µ

Smartphone makers prepare quad-core models for battle

March 2nd, 2012 No comments

 Smartphone makers prepare quad core models for battleMOST MAJOR smartphone makers unveiled quad-core beauties at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona this week, but it is hard to tell which device will be the next big thing.

Many of the handsets have very similar specifications including large displays that are just a shade under five inches and quad-core Nvidia Tegra 3 processors that are clocked at up to 1.5GHz.

Of course each manufacturer is taking a different approach to try to stand out in a crowded market. HTC has addressed a major weakness in its One range by upping the quality of its camera.

The firm is touting the image quality of its 8MP camera as it has redesigned the optics to help process clearer and brighter images. Of course the Taiwanese manufacturer also has its HTC Sense interface, which is the best looking and feature rich Android overlay we have tested, even though it drained its battery a little quicker than we liked.

LG’s latest mantra for its Optimus 4X HD handset is “clarity, colour and consumption”. The firm traditionally been strong when it comes to the displays, and with the Tegra 3 chip helping to lower power consumption, the firm could be onto a winner.

Meanwhile, Huawei is the manufacturer to watch as it is trying to win over users by ramping up its specifications. In terms of raw hardware the Ascend D range is going to have few peers. The 4.5in screen has 1,280×720 resolution and 330ppi (pixel-per-inch) density, which is higher than that of Apple’s Iphone.

The Chinese smartphone newcomer has designed its own 1.5GHz processor and added 16GPU cores, compared to 12 graphics cores in the Tegra 3. It claims its Ascend range will deliver the best graphical experience of any handset, and if true it could be a winner.

Of course things will get really interesting when the Samsung Galaxy S III arrives. This is expected to be another quad-core monster, and seeing as how the Korean firm has arguably the strongest brand in the smartphone market, aside from Apple, it is likely to be another hit for Samsung. But it will be good if one of the above manufacturers has a device that makes it a three horse race. µ

Proview takes court battle with Apple over Ipad name to Shanghai

February 22nd, 2012 No comments

CHINESE HARDWARE FIRM Shenzhen Proview Technology continues to harass Apple over the rights to the Ipad name and is persisting with its arguments that the fruit themed firm is at fault.

The debate is keeping lawyers in alligator shoes and sports cars and has claimed some Apple Ipads impromptu shelf clearances, and Proview shows no sign of letting up.

According to a report on the Associated Press the parties were in court in Shanghai yesterday and Proview’s lawyer Xie Xianghui said that any deal signed is invalid.

“Apple has no right to sell iPads under that name,” Xie said. “The agreement to sell the trademark is not valid under Chinese law,” he said.

Apple countered that if anyone had broken the agreement it was Proview, adding that Proview isn’t even using the Ipad name meaning that it can’t really claim it as a trademark. It also questioned whether Proview had the cash to see the argument through, something that its rival said that it could do.

Apple has appealed against previous rulings already, and stands firm in its insistence that Proview is wrong.

“We bought Proview’s worldwide rights to the Ipad trademark in 10 different countries several years ago,” begins the cappuccino company’s oft-repeated comment on the matter.

“Proview refuses to honour their agreement with Apple in China and a Hong Kong court has sided with Apple in this matter. Our case is still pending in mainland China.” µ

Samsung loses a German court battle against Apple

January 22nd, 2012 No comments

A GERMAN COURT has ruled against Samsung in its tit for tat patent war with Apple.

According to Reuters, Samsung hasn’t decided whether it will appeal the ruling, which covers one mobile technology patent. The German court has not made a decision on the other two mobile technologies that Samsung claims Apple infringed.

The court ruling comes after Apple sued Samsung last year, saying Samsung’s products “slavishly” copied the Ipad and Iphone. Samsung then countersued Apple and legal battles between the two companies spread across the globe.

Samsung stressed that Friday’s ruling relates to only one of several patents asserted by Samsung in the Mannheim court.

Earlier this month, Samsung failed to win a ban on the Iphone 4S in Italy. Meanwhile, in December Apple lost in an early court decision over the future of the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Germany after Samsung changed the design of the device.

Also in December, Samsung fired back at Apple in Germany by issuing four patent challenges.

Only this week, Apple filed two more lawsuits in Germany, one that alleges design patent infringements in ten of Samsung’s smartphones and another that levels similar charges for five of its tablets. It has asked for a ban on sales.

We have contacted both Apple and Samsung for comment on this latest German court ruling.

Update
Samsung sent us a statement, which said, “We are disappointed that the court did not share our views regarding the infringement by Apple of this specific patent in Germany. It should be noted that today’s ruling relates to only one of several patents asserted by Samsung in the Mannheim court.

“Today’s ruling is of no indicative value as to whether Apple may be found to infringe other of Samsung’s intellectual property rights in Germany. Rulings on additional Samsung patents relating to telecommunications standards are due to be handed down by the Mannheim court within the next few days and weeks, and specific legal analysis of whether Apple infringed on these patents will result in distinct rulings.

“We will wait for the written grounds of today’s judgment, and after thorough review make a decision about a possible appeal to the Higher Regional Court Karlsruhe.” µ